Home
reviews
album list
Add N to (X)
Adrenal
Aerial
Aerosmith
Aerovons
Afghan Whigs
Afrosound
Afterhours
Agamenón
Age
Age of Electric
Agents of Good Roots
Agitation Free
Agricantus
Christina Aguilera
Priscilla Ahn

Add N to (X)  (UK)

Add N to (X), 'Avant Hard'

Avant Hard  (1999,  56.21)  ***/TTT

Barry 7's Contraption
Robot New York
Skills
Steve's Going to Teach Himself Who's Boss
Fyuz
Buckminster Fuller
Revenge of the Black Regent
Metal Fingers in My Body
Ann's Eveready Equestrian
Oh Yeah, Oh No
Machine is Bored With Love
Add N to (X), 'Add Insult to Injury'

Add Insult to Injury  (2000,  60.28)  ***/TT½

Adding N to X
Brothel Charge
You Must Create
Kingdom of Shades
Monster Bobby
Poke 'er 'ole
Plug Me in
Hit for Cheese
MDMH (Miami Dust Mite Harvest)
BP Perino
Incinerator No 1
The Regent is Dead
Violent Breath
Add N to (X), 'Loud Like Nature'

Loud Like Nature  (2002,  51.03)  ***/TT

Total All Out Water
Electric Village
Sheez Mine
Invasion of the Polaroid People
Party Bag
Quantum Leap
Pink Light
Up the Punks
Take Me to Your Leader (Make Me Really Happy)
Lick a Battery (Tongues Across the Terminals)
. - U Baby
Large Number
All Night Lazy

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

Add N to (X) were one of Britain's chief electronica exponents, apparently specialising in using analogue equipment (hurrah!) to construct their bizarre sound sculptures whilst crapping from a great height onto the fey likes of Stereolab and their ilk. Whatever an 'ilk' actually is. I mean, do you ever hear the word used in any other context? They were also quite keen on writing about the human/machine interface, specifically sexually, which has to be a good thing. Er... Anyway, 1999's Avant Hard was their third album, apparently fairly typical of their oeuvre, skipping between vaguely danceable tracks (Skills, with its '60s-ish feel, Metal Fingers In My Body) and their more experimental side (most of the rest) with ease.

I've seen references to Mellotron sample use, but the album's 'Tron use sounds too skronky to be samples in several places (it turns out they bought Pallas' old Novatron). It is possible that Ann Shenton (I believe) sampled herself playing phrases on the machine which were then looped to death, but the actual sounds are too wobbly and uncertain to be regular samples. Anyway, we have a multiply-repeating string part on opener Barry 7's Contraption, with solo strings opening Revenge Of The Black Regent (good titles, this lot), plus cellos and choir. More strings and choir in Ann's Eveready Equestrian and flutes and cellos in Oh Yeah, Oh No, although I'm not at all sure what opens Machine Is Bored With Love. Its key-click suggests a Mellotron, but I haven't heard anything like it before. [Note: Mattias Puttonen tells me it's the boys choir]. Oh, and spot the Egg sample...

The following year's Add Insult to Injury is maybe an infinitesimal amount nearer the mainstream, but not so's you'd actually notice. More weird synth shit and more, well, weird synth shit, I suppose. Three 'Tron players this time round: Shenton, Barry 7 and Steve Claydon, although it's only audible on three tracks. One each? Kingdom Of Shades opens with 'Tron cellos, jerky choir notes and flutes entering the fray soon after, plus choirs, flutes, cellos and strings on closer The Regent Is Dead. Just when you thought it was all over, after a three-minute silence (removed from the timing above), a hidden track, Violent Breath, kicks in, all 'Tron flutes and clanking somethings, which is a nice bonus.

By Add N's swansong, 2002's Loud Like Nature, vocals (of a sort) were starting to make their presence felt a little more, and despite it still being a pretty odd album, it's rather less odd than its predecessors, which may've precipitated their split, or may not have. Mellotron (Shenton again?), with distant choirs throughout Quantum Leap, an upfront string part on Pink Light, and having finally started using the damn' thing, it seems there's no stopping her/them, with flutes, cellos and strings on Up The Punks, at which point it suddenly drops out.

So; three very individualistic albums, three lots of genuine Mellotron use, though be warned: not for the faint-hearted, or those who like things on the gentler side. Incidentally, after the split, Shenton sold their Novatron on to I Monster.

Adrenal  (UK)

Adrenal, 'Hollow Words EP'

Hollow Words EP  (1996,  15.06)  **½/TT

Hollow Words
Turn Away
Byronic Man
Radio Music Intermission

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

Adrenal were, going by their 1996 EP Hollow Words, a fairly typical Brit-indie act of the time, i.e. a bit post-Britpop while looking for the next set of coattails to ride. Harsh? Probably, but it's a pretty average piece of work, to be honest, sounding like a thousand other bands you could see in Camden's pubs'n'clubs every night at the time, with the notable exception of its last track, Radio Music Intermission, listed as "An instrumental tribute to Kraftwerk's Radioactivity-period", making it the most interesting thing here by a country mile.

Duncan Goddard of Radio Massacre International plays his own Mellotron on the EP, with faint strings on Turn Away and string section and choir on Radio Music Intermission. I don't know how many tape frames he owned at the time (more than me, though), but it's possible there's some other stuff going on here, too. Anyway, not a very exciting effort, but one decent 'Tron track.

Advance Base  (US)  see: Samples

Aerial  (Canada)

Aerial, 'In the Middle of the Night'

In the Middle of the Night  (1978,  37.30)  ***/TT½

Harmony
In the Middle of the Night
Easy Love

All Right
If Only I Were Older
Indispensable Thomas Hensible
Race the Sun
You've Got a Way

Gypsy Face

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

Aerial began as a Beatles tribute band, Liverpool, before branching out in order to record their own material. Signed to Anthem (Max Webster, Rush in Canada), they released two albums, debuting with 1978's In the Middle of the Night. It neatly straddles the powerpop, AOR and pomp divides, opener Harmony actually utilising the term 'Merseybeat' in its lyrics, Easy Love (a hit) being straightforward late '70s pop/rock, while the stomping Indispensable Thomas Hensible is an early example of a little-known phenomenon, Canadian Bands Using Silly Names In Song Lyrics, repeated by Saga the same year with Ellery Sneed on their debut's The Perfectionist and Nightwinds from the following year, with The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button (admittedly from the F. Scott Fitzgerald short story).

Keys man Malcolm Buchanan is credited with Mellotron, with flutes, background strings and choir on Harmony, upfront strings on the title track and Easy Love, background choirs on Race The Sun and strings and choirs on the proggy You've Got A Way, all to reasonable effect. Although this came out on CD as early as 1994, paired with its (Mellotron-free?) successor, 1980's Maneuvers, I'd be surprised if that version's still in print, sadly. Hardcore proggers will probably not be as interested in this as they might, but pomp fans really should make the effort to track a copy down. As for the Mellotron, while it's used fairly extensively, it probably isn't enough to make it worth shelling out for, but enough to be worth hearing.

Aerosmith  (US)

Aerosmith, 'Aerosmith'

Aerosmith  (1973,  36.01)  ***½/TT

Make it
Somebody
Dream on
One Way Street
Mama Kin
Write Me
Movin' Out
Walkin' the Dog
Aerosmith, 'Permanent Vacation'

Permanent Vacation  (1987,  51.46)  ***½/TT

Heart's Done Time
Magic Touch
Rag Doll
Simoriah
Dude (Looks Like a Lady)
St. John
Hangman Jury
Girl Keeps Coming Apart
Angel
Permanent Vacation
I'm Down
The Movie
Aerosmith, 'Get a Grip'

Get a Grip  (1993,  65.38)  ***/½

Intro
Eat the Rich
Get a Grip
Fever
Livin' on the Edge
Flesh
Walk on Down
Shut Up and Dance
Cryin'
Gotta Love it
Crazy
Line Up
Can't Stop Messin'
Amazing
Boogie Man
Aerosmith, 'Music From Another Dimension!'

Music From Another Dimension!  (2012,  68.06)  ***/½

LUV XXX
Oh Yeah
Beautiful
Tell Me
Out Go the Lights
Legendary Child
What Could Have Been Love
Street Jesus
Can't Stop Lovin' You
Lover Alot
We All Fall Down
Freedom Fighter
Closer
Something
Another Last Goodbye

Current availability:

Mellotrons used:

Aerosmith probably don't need much introduction, especially to US readers; the quintessential American hard rock/rock'n'roll outfit from the '70s who reinvented themselves in the '80s by bringing in outside writers to become by far and away the best of the 'big hair' metal bands, although it could be said that they transcended the genre completely.

They coalesced around 1970 from various other Boston-area bands, and it only took them a couple of years to get signed, releasing their eponymous debut with its astoundingly cheapo sleeve in '73, consisting (like so many bands) of the best of their live set. Aerosmith contains several numbers played regularly by the band till this day, including the best ballad they'll ever write, Dream On. Steven Tyler's impassioned vocal belies his years, and Joe Perry's blues-influenced guitar style comes into its own, creating a song that has sadly become a bit of a cliché, particularly on US 'classic rock' radio, where I believe it's only slightly less ubiquitous than Stairway To Heaven. One of the best things about the song is the Mellotron; beautifully played (by Tyler, uncredited) strings and flutes that lift the song to another level. In their tell-all autobiography of a few years ago, 'Walk This Way', Tyler had this to say about it:

"It came with a standard set of tapes that included brass, flute, violins, cello, and an eight-voice choir. By overdubbing you had a cheesy-sounding orchestra at your fingertips.
"So I put the string section on Dream On sitting at this Mellotron while a friend of mine kept laying out lines of crystal THC that I was snorting while I was playing. That's my memory of the Mellotron, except that we used it for the flute of Dream On too".

Beat that for Mellotron drug stories... Anyway, a good album, if otherwise pretty basic, and some great 'Tron. So what is 'crystal THC' anyway?

It took Aerosmith another fourteen years to use a Mellotron again, apparently due to producer Bruce Fairbairn's association with Canadians Strange Advance's Drew Arnott, a 'Tron owner. Permanent Vacation was the second album recorded by the reformed original lineup, and the one to break the band wide open all over again, a position they've managed to sustain to this day. There's no denying its commerciality; Dude (Looks Like A Lady) was on constant rotation on MTV throughout '87, and the album sold in its millions. However, it's still recognisably the same band who recorded Aerosmith a lifetime earlier; the acoustic swamp blues of Hangman Jury, the stomping opener Heart's Done Time. Basically, Aerosmith took on the young guns and beat them at their own game, while royally taking the piss at the same time (see: Dude). Much of the album is a little unlistenable these days though, at least to my ears, and the only thing that saves the big ballad Angel is the major 'Tron string arrangement, but closing instrumental The Movie is an excellent little track, improved further by its Mellotronic content.

Now, I was convinced that was it for Aerosmith's Mellotron usage. Nothing on '89's excellent Pump (****), and although I've seen mentions of 'Tron use on their belated follow-up, '93's Get a Grip, I'd discounted them until it was very specifically pointed out to me. It's another typical Aerosmith album, to be honest, although it outstays its welcome a little; this is music made for 40-minute bursts, tops. Plenty of good tracks, though little of the quality of their '70s material; Eat The Rich, Livin' On The Edge and Flesh would all easily make a 'best of their later stuff' compilation, and the short instrumental Boogie Man is so much better than the title suggests, but don't go expecting Rocks pt 2, OK? Next to no 'Tron, actually, with nothing more than a near-inaudible polyphonic flute part near the beginning of Cryin'. No wonder I didn't spot it earlier.

The band's fifteenth (and last?) studio album, 2012's Music From Another Dimension!, is a decent enough effort, considering they've been around the block a few times, although it suffers from over-length (albeit not as long as it could've been), with several songs rather outstaying their welcome, although its worst crime is a lack of truly memorable songs. It all sounds like Aerosmith, just without the tunes. Saying that, there's some nicely angular riffage on Beautiful, Closer is undoubtedly the album's best ballad, while the Hammond-driven Something displays a little of the old band's fire. Mellotron? Paul Santo is credited on Closer, with a distant string part that doesn't sound especially authentic, ditto the uncredited flutes (the strings are real) on closer Another Last Goodbye (played by Tyler?). So why do I not simply sling this into 'samples'? An unsureness, although that hasn't stopped me in the past.

So, you probably know what the band sound like; there are some good Mellotron bits on each album, but none of them are worth buying for that alone, so I'd only invest if you like Aerosmith anyway.

Official site

Aerovons  (US)

Aerovons, 'Resurrection'

Resurrection  (2003, recorded 1969,  46.23)  ***/T

World of You
Resurrection
Say Georgia
With Her
Quotes and Photos
Words From a Song
Bessy Goodheart
Something of Yours
She's Not Dead
The Years
Everything's Alright
The Children
The Train
Song for Jane
Here
World of You (demo)

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

The Aerovons were one of those one-in-a-million bands who actually manage to realise their dreams, if only briefly. Forming in St Louis in 1966 while still all extremely young, they got themselves signed to EMI, and ended up recording at Abbey Road in the Beatles' downtime, even managing to piss Lennon off by messing around on the bed he'd had installed at Yoko's instigation. Actually, I'd have paid good money to've seen John lay into them; I believe the quote was something like "Oi, wack - what th'fuck d'ya think you're doing?" Anyway, after recording an album's-worth of material and having a couple of non-selling singles released on Parlophone, the band were dropped and split up.

The music? Well, despite their origins, the Aerovons would've easily passed for a second-division British psych/pop outfit, with Bessy Goodheart sounding like a Sgt. Pepper outtake, and leader Tom Hartman sounding uncannily like McCartney on Something Of Yours. While Resurrection, finally released in 2003, shows considerable talent, it also reveals the band to be, essentially, Beatles imitators, although it has to be said they were pretty damn' good at it. They occasionally shifted into sounding like someone else, with Words From A Song copping the Bee Gees something rotten, but overall, its the Beatles all the way (what have they ripped off on The Children?).

Mellotron? Well, the strings on opener World Of You are real, but I'd swear blind that's a high, single-note 'Tron line on Words From A Song, with more of the same on The Train, a single added to the end of the originally-proposed album sequence. There are also a couple of special-FX inserts that could be 'Tron, but they're not the sounds I've heard before.

Anyway, although it's not worth it for the 'Tron, Resurrection is worth the effort for late-'60s completists and Beatles nuts, although it's possibly too derivative for the more casual listener.

Official site

Afghan Whigs  (US)

Afghan Whigs, 'Gentlemen'

Gentlemen  (1993,  49.03)  ***½/T

If I Were Going
Gentlemen
Be Sweet
Debonair
When We Two Parted
Fountain and Fairfax
What Jail is Like
My Curse
Now You Know
I Keep Coming Back
Brother Woodrow/Closing Prayer

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

The Afghan Whigs started as one of legendary Seattle label Sub Pop's main attractions, later tempering their full-on proto-grunge with melody. Gentlemen is doubtless going to be one of those 'growers', with almost every track supporting Greg Dulli's ultra-personal lyrics (he couldn't even bring himself to sing My Curse, apparently, getting guest vocalist Marcy Mays to sing it). This man is in a lot of pain and, just for once, I'm not taking the piss.

Harold Chichester plays piano on most tracks, and although you can hear Barb Hunter's cello in several places, Chichester's Mellotron strings only finally surface in closing instrumental Brother Woodrow/Closing Prayer, sounding strained and screechy. Despite its apparent no-show on the rest of the album, a final string note is almost the last sound you hear, so; a damn' good album of its kind, but you're not all going to go for this stuff, and it really isn't worth it for the 'Tron, although that's no criticism of the frequently excellent music.

Official site

See: Twilight Singers

AfroReggae  (Brazil)  see: Samples

Afrosound  (Colombia)

Afrosound, 'Cumbia De E.T. El Extraterrestre' 7"  (1983)  ***/TT

Cumbia de E.T. El Extraterrestre
El Regreso de E.T. El Extraterrestre

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

(The) Afrosound were apparently Colombia's answer to the Peruvian and Bolivian Chicha movement of the '70s, combining traditional South American music with modern funk and soul, creating a very danceable hybrid in the process. 1983's Cumbia De E.T. El Extraterrestre single (once again, thanks to Mark Medley for this) is a bizarre (and surprisingly listenable) tribute to Spielberg's cheese classic E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, fusing the band's usual sound with a (very) slightly space-age sensibility, the end result sounding like Colombia's answer to, say, John Keating's space age easy listening albums of the early '70s.

Someone (Jose A. Villerias, credited with 'effects'?) plays Mellotron strings on both sides, including some magnificent tape-wobble on the flip, to amusing effect, although I've no idea where they sourced the machine. Of course, as Mark says, this leaves the field wide open: did they use one on anything else?

Afterhours  (Italy)

Afterhours, 'Quello Che Non C'è'

Quello Che Non C'è  (2002,  44.16)  **½/0

Quello Che Non C'è
Bye Bye Bombay
Sulle Labbra
Varanasi Baby
Non Sono Immaginario
La Gente Sta Male
Bungee Jumping
Ritorno a Casa
Il Mio Ruolo
Afterhours, 'Ballate per Piccole Iene/Ballads for Little Hyenas'

Ballate per Piccole Iene  [a.k.a. Ballads for Little Hyenas]  (2005/2006,  44.05/48.53)  **½/T

La Sottile Linea Bianca (The Thin White Line)
Ballata Per La Mia Piccola Iena (Ballad for My Little Hyena)
È La Fine La Pił Importante (The Ending is the Greater)
Ci Sono Molti Modi (There's Many Ways)
La Vedova Bianca (White Widow)
Carne Fresca (Fresh Flesh)
Male in Polvere (Sparkle)
Chissà Com'è (Desire Froze Here)
The Bed
Il Sangue di Giuda (Judah's Blood)
Il Compleanno di Andrea (Andrea's Birthday)
Afterhours, 'I Milanesi Ammazzano il Sabato'

I Milanesi Ammazzano il Sabato  (2008,  43.01)  **½/½

Naufragio Sull' Isola del Tesoro
È Solo Febbre
Neppure Carne da Cannone per Dio
Tarantella All'Inazione
Pochi Istanti Nella Lavatrice
I Milanesi Ammazzano il Sabato

Riprendere Berlino
Tutti gli Uomini del Presidente
Musa di Nessuno
Tema: La Mia Città
E' Dura Essere Silvan
Dove Si Va Da Qui
Tutto Domani
Orchi e Streghe Sono Soli (Ninna Nanna Reciproca)

Current availability:

Mellotrons used:

Afterhours (apparently named for a Velvets song) are a classic 'local market' band; playing a generally popular style singing in their own language, with a huge following in their own country, comprising kids who can't get to see the band's forebears. Cynical? Moi? They're generally described as 'alternative rock', whatever you take that to mean; sounds like a combination of the Velvets and post-hardcore to me, but what do I know?

2002's Quello Che Non C'è is something like their eighth album, neither actually bad nor especially good, better tracks including Sulle Labbra and closer Il Mio Ruolo, featuring one of those transcendent 'sticks like glue' melodies. Manuel Agnelli is credited with Mellotron, but without track-by-track credits, it's impossible to tell where it might be. Is that a cello? A flute? Another keyboard or even a guitar? Hopeless.

Having recorded a couple of English-language albums early in their career, Afterhours took the decision to make (presumably) a last-ditch assault on the English-speaking market, re-mixing their 2005 release, Ballate per Piccole Iene with English vocals, reissuing it the following year as Ballads for Little Hyenas with one extra track. It's not a dissimilar album to Quello Che Non C'è, meaning you'll have to be something of an alt.rock aficionado to really appreciate its subtleties, although the band seem to've upped their compositional skills in the interim, notably on closer Il Compleanno Di Andrea/Andrea's Birthday. Incidentally, do I hear a Bono cop on Ci Sono Molti Modi/There's Many Ways? I keep expecting the vocalist to sing, "Wipe your tears away!" Mellotron this time round from Greg Dulli (Afghan Whigs/Twilight Singers and David Adams, meaning we actually get to hear it, with an upfront string part on La Vedova Bianca/White Widow and less of the same on Il Sangue Di Giuda/Judah's Blood.

2008's I Milanesi Ammazzano il Sabato is supposed to be the band's 'most dissonant album yet', according to one online enthusiast, although to my ears, it's pretty much more of the same. Competent alt.rock, a couple of decent melodies, nothing you haven't heard done better by (largely) American bands. Mellotron from Agnelli again, with mad, stabbing flutes on Pochi Istanti Nella Lavatrice and distant strings on the title track, although it's perfectly possible there are more flutes hidden away on other tracks.

Overall, then, unless you're a Greg Dulli completist who has to own everything with which he's been involved, or an Italian alt.rocker, you probably don't need to own any of these. Precisely one decent 'Tron track amongst the lot of 'em, too.

Official site

Agalloch  (US)  see: Samples

Agamenón  (Spain)

Agamenón, 'Todos Ríen de Mi'

Todos Ríen de Mi  (1975,  36.18)  ***/T

Todos Ríen de Mi
Al Salir el Sol
Please Little Man
Happy Marriage, Eleanor
Send Me
Blow Up the Candle (Apaga la Vela)
Cuco Go Fly (Cuco Te Vas)
Happy Tuesday
Wooden Tears
I Need Money

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

I can't say I know an awful lot about Agamenón, a particularly obscure Spanish outfit from Madrid, although they were far more late-period psych than progressive. Todos Ríen de Mi is a reasonable album, but it sounds more like 1968 than 1975, and some of the male/female harmonies are painfully off, although it's partially redeemed by the acid-fried guitar work splattered across most of the tracks.

Not much Mellotron, to be honest, with faint strings on Blow Up The Candle (Apaga La Vela), leaving Happy Tuesday as the only 'Tron track proper, with a strident string part running through much of the song. So; OK, not great (apologies to those that love it), one good 'Tron track, that's your lot.

Age  (Germany)

Age, 'The Orion Years'

The Orion Years  (1999,  72.05)  ***/0

Lichtspruch
Lagrange Point L 5
Imaginary Friend
Parallelwelt
Transmitter - Love
Lancet
Eine Fremde Lebensform
Big E
Zeitsprung

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

Age's The Orion Years is a tribute to the iconic mid-'60s black and white German science fiction TV show Raumpatrouille Orion (Space Patrol Orion) that, despite the mere seven episodes filmed, influenced German culture heavily - their very own Star Trek. Musically speaking, the album apparently falls into the 'trance' sub-genre, a.k.a. relaxing bleeps and bloops over not-too-invasive rhythms, pootling along without making that much of an impression either way.

The band use an impressive variety of equipment; while individual models aren't specified, manufacturers include Moog, ARP, Oberheim, OSC (presumably the Oscar), Octave (The Cat and/or Kitten) and Germany's very own PPG (early digital, a welcome alternative to Yamaha's ubiquitously tedious DX7). Plus, of course, the Mellotron. Allegedly. In actuality, it's entirely inaudible, the only 'possible' part turning out to be a synth patch. So; surprisingly inoffensive, some nice analogue synth sounds, but no 'Tron.

Age of Electric  (Canada)

Age of Electric, 'Make a Pest a Pet'

Make a Pest a Pet  (1996,  51.23)  ***/T½

Remote Control
I Don't Mind
Nothing Happens
Unity or Grenadine
You Complain
Scare Myself
Blow Up
Don't Wreck it
Cranky
Real Stumper
Mad at the World
My Mistake
Exist to Resist

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

The Age of Electric were a Canadian quartet consisting of two pairs of brothers, which must've made for some interesting rehearsal room/tour bus arguments. Apparently highly successful in their home country, they make a pretty appealing indie/powerpop sound on their last album, 1996's Make a Pest a Pet, top tracks including opener Remote Control (apparently a 'radio hit' at home), Nothing Happens and Don't Wreck It.

Chris Bryant plays Mellotron strings, with what sounds like backwards ones on Unity Or Grenadine, regular ones towards the end of Scare Myself and very background ones on Cranky, all to passable effect. Overall, then, not at all bad, if a little overlong; losing a couple of the weaker tracks would not only improve the album, but make it more concise.

MySpace

See: Limblifter

Ageness  (Finland)  see: Samples

Agent Error  (Germany)  see: Samples

Agents of Good Roots  (US)

Agents of Good Roots, 'Needle & Thread'

Needle & Thread  (2000,  49.37)  **/T

I Gotta Move
Jakob
Radio King
Meet Me on Main Street
What I Need
Innocent Days
Shot Down
The Blinds
Beautiful Genius
John Brown
Everyday

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

Agents of Good Roots perfected their roots rock/jazz/funk style on the same East Coast circuit as the considerably more popular Dave Matthews Band, probably appealing to a generally similar audience. 2000's Needle & Thread was their fourth and last album, a not-especially-appealing mix of the above genres, at their least bad when pushing the boat out a little, as on a brief section in opener I Gotta Move or the jazzy extemporisation in Shotdown.

Stewart Myers plays Mellotron on two tracks, with strings on The Blinds and strings and choir on John Brown, sounding wobbly enough to be real, which is nowhere near enough to make it worth hearing this tedious album. They released an EP, Seed, the same year, Myers credited again, although, given that its lead-off track is John Brown, it may actually have no other Mellotronic input.

MySpace

Agents of Mercy  (Sweden)  see: Samples

Agitation Free  (Germany)

Agitation Free, '2nd'

2nd  (1973,  41.33)  ***½/½

First Communication
Dialogue & Random
Laila, part 1
Laila, part 2
In the Silence of the Morning Sunrise
A Quiet Walk
Haunted Island

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

Agitation Free grew up out of the Berlin scene in the late '60s, giving members away to several bands who went on to become better-known, including Ash Ra Tempel and Tangerine Dream. Their debut, Malesch, was heavily influenced by their recent Near-Eastern trip, while the material on the following year's 2nd was pieced together on several trips to France. Above all, this is a jamming record; all the pieces are obviously either direct improvs, or worked up from them, with the first four tracks (presumably the whole of side one) merging into one continuous piece.

Drummer Burghard Rausch adds a few rich Mellotron string chords near the beginning of closing jam Haunted Island, but you wouldn't exactly call it a 'Tron track, never mind album. Basically, if you're into the 'krautrock' ethos, or at least the gentler, jamming end of it, you'll probably like Agitation Free; they were obviously extremely good at what they did, and 2nd was a far more enjoyable listen than many similar albums to which I've been subjected. A cautious recommendation, then, though not for the 'Tron.

Official site

See: Ash Ra Tempel | Tangerine Dream

Agricantus  (Italy)

Agricantus, 'Ethnosphere'

Ethnosphere  (2001,  68.50)  ***/T

Pinseri
Nye Nindu
Rang-Wang Tibet
Gyantsé
Shudde
Dawa
Orbi Terrarum
Vajra
Kanassila
Jusu e Susu
Mellit Mellit
Essence
Presence
Change
Ciavula
Jusu e Susu (radio edit)

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

Agricantus are an Italian ethno/new age outfit, whose 2001 release, Ethnosphere, is available in two different versions: an inexplicable two-disc version for their home market (even with a radio edit added, it's under seventy minutes) and a shorter international issue. It sounds exactly as you'd expect, with 'world' instruments and vocal styles melded to modern synths and programmed rhythms, the end result being the kind of thing that probably inspires about as much euphoria as detestation, this listener finding himself falling more towards the latter state than the former, especially after over an hour of its warbling inanities.

Roberto "Pivio" Pischiutta plays Mellotron on Gyantsé, with a chordal string part that may or may not be genuine; given the release date, most samples still sounded pretty much like what they were at the time, which ups the chances of this one being real. Note: only 'ups'. To be honest, unless you're a new age devotee, you're not going to last more than a few tracks, anyway, so one is it/isn't it Mellotron track is unlikely to change your mind. Three stars? There's nothing specifically wrong with this (he said, grudgingly), I just don't actually like it very much.

Official site

Pepe Aguilar  (US)  see: Samples

Christina Aguilera  (US)

Christina Aguilera, 'Back to Basics'

Back to Basics  (2006,  78.32)  **½/0

Intro (Back to Basics)
Back in the Day
Makes Me Wanna Pray
Ain't No Other Man
Understand
Without You
Slow Down Baby
Oh Mother
F.U.S.S. (Interlude)
On Our Way
Thank You
Still Dirrty
Here to Stay
Enter the Circus
Welcome
Candyman
Nasty Naughty Boy
I Got Trouble
Hurt
Mercy on Me
Save Me From Myself
Right Man

Current availability:

Mellotron used:

It's impossible to live in the Western world and not be aware of Christina Aguilera (surely?); teen Disney star turned mega-selling adult artist, she's pretty much conquered the Latin/R&B market over the last decade, despite releasing surprisingly few albums. 2006's Back to Basics is only her third full English-language release; an overlong double disc (although it would just fit on a single), it mixes her usual style with Latin, cabaret, jazz and blues, although it's overwhelmingly an R&B record, to be honest. She suffers from the same problem as other current divas (see: Mariah Carey), in that she's got a great voice and knows it, wailing away over material that just needs a good, steady voice to sing the bloody tune. What's with all this showing-off crap? Horrible. Anyway, although it's perfectly good at what it does, I'm on a bit of a loser attempting to pick out anything resembling a 'best track'; it's all functional, singalong radio stuff, but it's blander than the muck peddled by various US-based hamburger chains and shallower than the gene pool in a hick Southern town.

One of several co-producers, Linda Perry (4 Non Blondes, much production work) allegedly plays Mellotron on the album, but there's no obvious sign of it amongst the high-gloss production, although I'm sure it could be secreted away almost anywhere. So; mainstream pop, effectively, albeit with a swing-era twist. Y'know, you really, really are not going to like anything about this record, unless a) you have a secret yearning for MTV-fodder, or b) you've found your way here looking for Aguilera reviews.

Official site

Priscilla Ahn  (US)

Priscilla Ahn, 'A Good Day'

A Good Day  (2008,  35.53)  **/½

Dream
Wallflower
I Don't Think So
Masters in China
Leave the Light on
Red Cape
Astronaut
Lullaby
Find My Way Back Home
Opportunity to Cry
A Good Day (Morning Song)
Priscilla Ahn, 'When You Grow Up'

When You Grow Up  (2011,  44.56)  **½/TT

When You Grow Up
One Day I Will Do
Oo La La
Vibe So Hot
City Lights
I Don't Have Time to Be in Love
Cry Baby
Lost Cause
Empty House
I Will Get Over You
Elf Song

Torch Song

Current availability:

Chamberlins/Mellotron used:

Despite being signed to jazz specialists Blue Note, Priscilla Ahn is the kind of singer-songwriter whose songs get used in sloppy films or TV programmes like Grey's Anatomy. Her debut album, 2008's A Good Day, is a super-bland effort, tailor-made to be played in Starbucks or wherever, mostly vaguely folky stuff, overlaid by her insubstantial vocals, with the occasional countryish twang (Leave The Light On) thrown in for good (or otherwise) measure. Zac Rae plays Chamberlin on Wallflower, with the faintest of faint, er, something (strings? Flutes?), that you'd have absolutely no idea was there if it wasn't credited. This is pretty awful, to be honest, if heartfelt; drippy nonsense of the worst kind. She'll sell millions.

Now, I don't know if I'm in a mellower mood a couple of years on, but 2011's When You Grow Up, despite still being fairly drippy, doesn't inspire the same hatred in me at all; in fact, it's quite sweet, admittedly in a drippy kind of way. Maybe it's simply a better album? Ahn and Ethan Johns both play Mellotron, while Ahn throws a bit of Chamberlin in for good measure, with a nicely upfront Mellotron flute part and vibes (from both players) on Oo La La, Mellotron (flute) and Chamberlin (unidentified woodwind and guitar?) from Ahn on I Will Get Over You and Mellotron on Elf Song (harp glissandos??) from Johns, although the strings on City Lights and Lost Cause are real.

I seriously cannot recommend Ahn's debut, but When You Grow Up will probably keep Laurel Canyon-style singer-songwriter fans happy while they wait for the old guard to trawl through their archives again.

Official site


previous pagenext page