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Tom Hamilton. No, not that one. (Milwaukee, Wisconsin)

This alphabetical list contains selections from 1969-1975:

  1. Camel: Never Let Go (Camel; 1973) Love the flute tapes/real flute(?) interplay
  2. Genesis: Dancing with the Moonlit Knight (Selling England By the Pound; 1973) Choir, violins, and...brass? Poignant and powerful mixture
  3. King Crimson: Cirkus (Lizard; 1970) Perhaps my favorite. I'm taken to mouth-Mellotron the ominous MkII brass hook while it's playing and sometimes when it's not! Violins really provide the 'things-gone-terribly-awry-at-the-circus' atmosphere
  4. King Crimson: The Court of the Crimson King (In the Court of the Crimson King; 1969) Listen to those up-front violins carry you away! Sublime Mellotron music. Special note: That counter-lead on 'Epitaph' blows me away, too. (Notice how I slipped a third H.M. onto the list?)
  5. King Crimson: Trio (Starless and Bible Black; 1973) Lead flute with the limitations that make the Mellotron so endearing. No need for lyrics with the amazing story telling of the instruments
  6. Moody Blues: Beyond (To Our Children's Children's Children, 1969) Space instrumental with cool effects. Are there examples of the Moodies' low-speed motoring technique here? Hmm...
  7. Moody Blues: I'm Just a Singer in a Rock'n'Roll Band (Seventh Sojourn; 1972) Yes, overbearing lyrics. Yes, overplayed in U.S. Yes, I'm told it's Chamberlin. But I love the punchy, honking brass, and it's my favorite violins counter-lead. Cool stop-start song construction
  8. Pavlov's Dog: Late November (Pampered Menial; 1975) Great title for a prog tune; that's the right time of season for Mellotron appreciation, and the violins really set the mood. This St. Louis, Missouri band is my only American entry
  9. Strawbs: Life Auction (Ghosts; 1974) Some more rich and ominous sounding Mellotron. Slow haunting pitch-bends add nice tension to this great bombastic English Prog gem
  10. Yes: And You and I (Close to the Edge; 1972) Symphonic bliss


  11. Honorable mention:

  12. Moody Blues: New Horizons (Seventh Sojourn; 1972) Lovely song, drenched in lush (Chamberlin?) violins
  13. Trace: Galliarde (Trace; 1974) Lots of 'Tron for the money. This Bach interpreted selection has stately violins and choir, and...is that a trumpet tapes solo? You'll be pleased when this part arrives


Jon Salley (Hutchinson, Kansas)

  1. Genesis: Supper's Ready (Foxtrot; 1972) The incredible nuclear detonation of 3 violins at the end (from the lyric "a brand new tune" to the end)
  2. Genesis: Can-Utility and the Coastliners (Foxtrot; 1972) The tidal wave of the solo
  3. Genesis: Watcher of the Skies (Foxtrot; 1972) The ENDING solo
  4. Yes: Heart of the Sunrise (Fragile; 1971)
  5. Moody Blues: Gypsy (To Our Childrens' Childrens' Children; 1969)
  6. Gentle Giant: Three Friends (Three Friends, 1972) The ending fadeout
  7. Moody Blues: The Voyage (On The Threshold of a Dream; 1969)
  8. Yes: The Remembering (Tales From Topographic Oceans; 1973) The end of Side Two featuring the huge 8-voice choir for the first time in a Yes studio album
  9. Rick Wakeman: Catherine Howard (The Six Wives of Henry VIII; 1973)
  10. David Bowie: Space Oddity (Space Oddity; 1969)

Special Honourable Mention to the little bit of 3-violins in "America" on the Atlantic sampler record that introduced Rick Wakeman to the world as Yes' new keyboardist before "Fragile" was released and demonstrated that they were becoming an incredible force in the keyboard realm. Let the games begin, Mr. Emerson! [Editor's note: also available on Yes' 'Yesterdays' compilation]


Ted Luce (Independence, Missouri)

  1. Yes: And You and I (Close to the Edge; 1972)
  2. Genesis: Dancing with the Moonlit Knight (Selling England By the Pound; 1973)
  3. PFM: Il Banchetto (Per un Amico/Photos of Ghosts; 1972/73)
  4. Barclay James Harvest: Galadriel (Once Again; 1971)
  5. Yes: Heart of the Sunrise (Fragile; 1971)
  6. Moody Blues: Forever Afternoon (Tuesday?) (Days of Future Passed; 1967)
  7. David Bowie: Space Oddity (Space Oddity; 1969)
  8. Beatles: Strawberry Fields Forever (single, 1967)
  9. Genesis: Mad Man Moon (A Trick of the Tail; 1976)
  10. Genesis: The Fountain of Salmacis (Nursery Cryme; 1971)


"Relayer250" (Maryland)


Mark Guempel (St.Louis, MO). I think Mark likes Genesis.

  1. Genesis: Dancing with the Moonlit Knight (Selling England By the Pound; 1973)
  2. Genesis: Entangled (A Trick of the Tail; 1976)
  3. Genesis: Watcher of the Skies (Foxtrot; 1972)
  4. Genesis: Dance on a Volcano (A Trick of the Tail; 1976)
  5. Genesis: The Fountain of Salmacis (Nursery Cryme; 1971)
  6. Genesis: Supper's Ready (Foxtrot; 1972)
  7. Genesis: The Lamia (The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway; 1974)
  8. Genesis: One for the Vine (Wind & Wuthering; 1976)
  9. Genesis: Eleventh Earl of Mar (Wind & Wuthering; 1976)
  10. Genesis: Firth of Fifth (Selling England By the Pound; 1973)


Jeff Runyan (Tennessee)

Top ten 'goose bump' moments (in order)

  1. King Crimson: In the Wake of Poseidon (In the Wake of Poseidon; 1970) (immediately, then again when the 'Tron plays the vocal melody)
  2. King Crimson: The Court of the Crimson King (In the Court of the Crimson King; 1969) (right after BOOM-Boom-boom...!)
  3. PFM: Appena un Po (Per un Amico; 1972) (the two build-up parts at the 4:00 and 6:30 points)
  4. Yes: Opening/Firebird Suite (Yessongs; 1973) (right before Siberian Khatru, great orchestra-'Tron transition)
  5. Sebastian Hardie: Four Moments/Dawn of Our Sun (Four Moments; 1975) (the flute 'Tron melody during part 2)
  6. King Crimson: Epitaph (In the Court of the Crimson King; 1969) (every time right after a tympani drumroll)
  7. Moody Blues: Dawn: Dawn is a Feeling (Days of Future Passed; 1967) (another great orchestra - 'Tron transition)
  8. Earth & Fire: Storm and Thunder (Song of the Marching Children; 1971) (slowly seeping in after 2 minutes of organ)
  9. Genesis: Firth of Fifth (Selling England By the Pound; 1973) (building up during Hackett's guitar solo)
  10. King Crimson: The Devil's Triangle (In the Wake of Poseidon; 1970) (that twisted bassoon sound right before the 4:00 point; never heard anything else like it)

Honorable mention: Starless - King Crimson/New World - Strawbs/Favole Antiche - Celeste/The Prisoner - Spring/And You and I - Yes/Heart of the Sunrise - Yes/Watcher of the Skies - Genesis/Fountain of Salmacis - Genesis/Shadow of the Hierophant - Steve Hackett/Tuesday Afternoon - Moody Blues


Jim Rigberg (Phoenix, Arizona). Jim's my chief guest reviewer.


George Schwalm (Sugar Land, Texas)

  1. Genesis: Watcher of the Skies (Foxtrot; 1972) Of course! Play this when your kids are misbehaving.
  2. Moody Blues: The Voyage (On The Threshold of a Dream; 1969) This is where it all started for my money [literally!]
  3. King Crimson: Epitaph (In the Court of the Crimson King; 1969) The ultimate catharsis!
  4. King Crimson: The Devil's Triangle (In the Wake of Poseidon; 1970) Three 'Trons at once here? A tour de force!
  5. Moody Blues: Beyond (To Our Childrens' Childrens' Children; 1969) Play this while watching "2001 A.S.O." stargate scene. Brownies anyone?
  6. Moody Blues: My Song (Every Good Boy Deserves Favour; 1971) Majestic! The Moodies should have quit after this one.
  7. Steve Miller Band: In My First Mind (Children of the Future; 1968) Balmy 'Tron strings on this one. Very evocative. An overlooked masterpiece.
  8. Tomita: The Engulfed Cathedral (Snowflakes Are Dancing; 1974) REALLY far out 'Tron choir.
  9. Jethro Tull: Cross-Eyed Mary (Aqualung; 1971) The intro gives me dat "Mellotron rush" like da man said!
  10. Rolling Stones: 2000 Light Years From Home (Their Satanic Majesties Request, 1967) God, how could I forget this one? Mellotron work makes it totally astronomical. Thanks, Bri'!

Honourable Mention: Tangerine Dream: "Rubicon". Nice experimental 'Tron work here. Also economical entry - an album for the price of a song.
DIShonorable Mention: Black Sabbath "Changes". Give me a break!
Song I Most Wish HAD Mellotron: Peter Hammill "Red Shift".
Conspicuous in its absence: Yes and Rick Wakeman : It's ALL good!


Jim Hresko (El Monte, California)

Jim - that's 11.


Nick Pulliam (North Chelmsford, Massachusetts)

  1. Genesis: The Fountain of Salmacis (Nursery Cryme; 1971)
  2. PFM: Appena un Po (intro) (Per un Amico; 1972)
  3. Gentle Giant: Three Friends (Three Friends; 1972)
  4. Yes: Heart of the Sunrise (Fragile; 1971)
  5. King Crimson: Epitaph (In the Court of the Crimson King; 1969)
  6. The Moody Blues: Out and in (To Our Children's Children's Children; 1969)
  7. Druid: Toward the Sun (Toward the Sun; 1975)
  8. Änglagård: Kung Bore (Hybris; 1992)
  9. Steve Hackett: Shadow of the Hierophant (Voyage of the Acolyte; 1975)
  10. Zombies: Care of Cell 44 (Odessey & Oracle, 1968)


Mike Lutgen (New Jersey)

  1. King Crimson: In the Wake of Poseidon (In the Wake of Poseidon; 1970)
  2. Genesis: The Fountain of Salmacis (Nursery Cryme; 1971)
  3. Arthur Brown's Kingdom Come: Galactic Zoo (Galactic Zoo Dossier; 1972)
  4. Noble Gas: Sand in the Sea (One Foot Above the Ground; 2003)
  5. Meat Beat Manifesto: Placebo (Satyricon; 1992)
  6. Gentle Giant: Wreck (Acquiring the Taste; 1971)
  7. Pink Floyd: Sysyphus (Ummagumma; 1969)
  8. Strawbs: Sad Young Man (Hero & Heroine; 1974)
  9. Yes: Close to the Edge (Close to the Edge; 1972)
  10. Rolling Stones: 2000 Light Years From Home (Their Satanic Majesties Request, 1967)


Joe Ellis (Fort Wayne, Indiana)

  1. Anekdoten: Sad Rain (Vemod (Japanese edition); 1993) Thank goodness this was released as a bonus track on their Japanese label - heavenly
  2. Deadwood Forest: Dry (Mellodramatic, 2000)
  3. Spring: Golden Fleece (Spring; 1971) 'Arm-waving' type of flowing 'Tron strings
  4. King Crimson: The Court of the Crimson King (In the Court of the Crimson King; 1969) It started my fascination with the Mellotron
  5. England: Three Piece Suite (Garden Shed; 1977)
  6. Genesis: Dancing with the Moonlit Knight (Selling England By the Pound; 1973)
  7. Moody Blues: Legend of a Mind (Caught Live + Five; 1977) Multiple LIVE pitchbends and in 1969!!! The 2nd rock band that I saw live (1970)
  8. Limelight: Man of Colours (Limelight; 1980) Thank you Andy
  9. Genesis: Firth of Fifth (Selling England By the Pound; 1973)
  10. Strawbs: Hero And Heroine (Hero And Heroine; 1974)


Scott Hamrick (Florida)


Dennis Montgomery (Santa Clara, California)

  1. King Crimson: Cirkus (Lizard; 1970)
  2. Genesis: The Fountain of Salmacis (Nursery Cryme; 1971)
  3. Greenslade: Feathered Friends (Greenslade; 1973)
  4. The Moody Blues: Forever Afternoon (Tuesday?) (Days of Future Passed, 1967)
  5. Celeste: Principe di un Giorno (Principe di un Giorno; 1976)
  6. Cathedral [US]: The Search (Stained Glass Stories; 1978)
  7. Spring: The Golden Fleece (Spring; 1971)
  8. Cathedral [UK]: Purple Wonderland (Hopkins (the Witchfinder General); 1996 EP)
  9. Grobschnitt: Anywhere (Rockpommels Land, 1977)
  10. Captain Beefheart: Sue Egypt (Doc at the Radar Station; 1980)

I limited myself to 1 entry per band so I didn't list my 10 favourite King Crimson songs :)  Honourable mentions to Black Sabbath 'Changes' (I love the combination of sad Ozzy & 'Tron) and the cover of Genesis Live which I spent hours staring at that white keyboard just knowing it had to be the mysterious Mellotron


John MacRae (South Salem, NY)

  1. Genesis: Watcher of the Skies [live] (Genesis Live; 1973)
  2. Harmonium: Histoires Sans Paroles (Les Cinq Saisons; 1975)
  3. King Crimson: Starless (Red; 1974)
  4. Celeste: Favole Antiche (Principle di un Giorno; 1974)
  5. Genesis: Mad Man Moon (A Trick of the Tail; 1976)
  6. Strawbs: Autumn (Hero & Heroine; 1973)
  7. SFF: Pictures (Symphonic Pictures; 1976)
  8. Lift: Simplicity/Caverns (Caverns Of Your Brain; 1977)
  9. Gracious!: Super Nova (This Is... Gracious!; 1971)
  10. Limelight: Man of Colours (Limelight; 1980) Thanks for this one Andy!!!


Marc Guilbert (Maryland)


Kevin Lewis (area unknown)

  1. Genesis: White Mountain (Trespass; 1970) The lesser used MKII tapes 'Mandolins' are heard in the beginning and the middle of it, they give an eerie distant quality to the song
  2. Moody Blues: The Balance (A Question of Balance; 1970) During Mike Pinder's narration about holding the orange, his trademark MKII warm reverbed 3 violins soar along with John Lodge's falsetto
  3. King Crimson: Providence (USA; 1975) Fripp randomly chops the keys and uses M400 flutes to very good effect. This track is very underrated and is a perfect song before...
  4. Traffic: Hole in My Shoe (single; 1967) The pitchbent 3 violins 'played by Mason?' in the middle of this after the 'albatross spoken part' are breathtaking!
  5. Rolling Stones: On With the Show (Their Satanic Majesties Request; 1967) Great 3 violins and Brass? choppy backing part along with pub piano to give it a vaudeville sound
  6. Yes: The Ancient (Tales From Topographic Oceans; 1973) After the long freakout steel guitar part ends Wakeman provides a beautiful 3 Violins & Cello part that transitions the first vocal line 'as one with the knowledge'
  7. Steve Howe: Will o'the Wisp (Beginnings; 1975) Patrick Moraz on M400 3 violins right before the last verse, rare use of a 'Tron string build up like an orchestra
  8. Yes: America (Yesterdays; 1975) Bill Bruford plays the great clicky 3 violins part near the end of the song after legend has it Wakeman was bored with doing a Paul Simon cover and went off to the pub
  9. King Crimson: Lizard (Lizard; 1970) The second side of Lizard is full of great if brief MKII 3 violin highlights including the dark 'Battle of Glass Tears' and the Jon Anderson sung 'Prince Rupert Awakes'
  10. Moody Blues: My Song (Every Good Boy Deserves Favour; 1971) Pinder's magnum opus, the ½ speed 3 violins shortly after the 2 minute mark are worth the price of admission


Matt (Connecticut)


Gary Owen (Staten Island, NY)

  1. Beatles: Strawberry Fields Forever (single; 1967)
  2. Moody Blues: Out and in (To Our Childrens' Childrens' Children; 1969)
  3. Paul McCartney: Summer's Day Song (McCartney II; 1980)
  4. Zombies: Care of Cell 44 (Odessey & Oracle; 1968)
  5. Manfred Mann: Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James (single; 1966)
  6. Rolling Stones: 2,000 Light Years From Home (Their Satanic Majesties Request; 1967)
  7. Cream: Doing That Scrapyard Thing (Goodbye; 1969)
  8. George Harrison: Wonderwall to Be Here (Wonderwall Music; 1968)
  9. Bee Gees: Every Christian Lion Hearted Man Will Show You (Bee Gees' 1st; 1967)
  10. Traffic: Hole in My Shoe (single; 1967)


Tom Echols (Portland, Oregon)

  1. Moody Blues: Legend of a Mind (In Search of the Lost Chord; 1968)
  2. Genesis: The Fountain of Salmacis (Nursery Cryme; 1971)
  3. Yes: And You and I (Close to the Edge; 1972)
  4. Genesis: One for the Vine (Wind & Wuthering; 1976) I can't believe nobody else mentioned this song!! Awesone interweaving of strings and choirs!  ("fairly ordinary string parts"? What?)
  5. Moody Blues: Out and in (To Our Childrens' Childrens' Children; 1969)
  6. Led Zeppelin: The Rain Song (Houses of the Holy; 1973)
  7. Rolling Stones: 2000 Light Years From Home (Their Satanic Majesties Request; 1967)
  8. Elton John: This Song Has No Title (Goodbye Yellow Brick Road; 1973)
  9. Paul McCartney: Singalong Junk (McCartney; 1970)
  10. Brian Auger's Oblivion Express: Inner City Blues (Closer to it!; 1973) What it lacks in 'tron quantity it makes up for with an ethereal quality
  11. Beatles: Flying (Magical Mystery Tour; 1967) allright, I guess we have to include the Fab Four...

Eleven there, Tom! Naughty... And there is one other vote for One For The Vine, but life really is too short to search for it, eh?


Rest of World

Clay Eccles, from the Mellotronists list (Toronto, Canada)


Christopher Orczy (New Zealand)


Arjan van Diessen (The Netherlands)

Plus Arjan's top ten albums:


Jussi Jokinen (Finland)

  1. King Crimson: Mars (Epitaph - Live 1969; 1997)
  2. Genesis: Watcher of the Skies (Foxtrot; 1972)
  3. Tangerine Dream: Zeit (Zeit; 1972) Editor's note: no Mellotron on this one - it's all cellos
  4. Van der Graaf Generator: A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers (Pawn Hearts; 1971)
  5. Yes: Close to the Edge (Close to the Edge; 1972)
  6. Caravan: Nine Feet Underground (In the Land of Grey and Pink; 1971)
  7. David Bowie: Space Oddity (Space Oddity; 1969)
  8. Radiohead: Exit Music (for a Film) (OK Computer; 1997)
  9. Beatles: Strawberry Fields Forever (single; 1967)
  10. King Crimson: The Court of the Crimson King (In The Court of the Crimson King; 1969)


Fabio Menegus (Italy)

  1. Genesis: 'As Sure as Eggs is Eggs', from Supper's Ready (Foxtrot; 1972)
  2. Genesis: Silent Sorrow in Empty Boats (The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway; 1974)
  3. King Crimson: Epitaph (In the Court of the Crimson King; 1969)
  4. Yes: And You and I (Close to the Edge; 1972)
  5. Genesis: Dancing with the Moonlit Knight (Selling England By the Pound; 1973)
  6. King Crimson: In the Wake of Poseidon (In the Wake of Poseidon; 1970)
  7. Genesis: Watcher of the Skies (Foxtrot; 1972)
  8. Steve Hackett: Hands of the Priestess (Voyage of the Acolyte; 1975)
  9. Steve Hackett: The Steppes (Defector; 1980)
  10. Genesis: Firth of Fifth (Selling England By the Pound; 1973)


A gentleman rejoicing in the nom-de-plume U-Suck (Japan). He's listed albums, not tracks, but here they are anyway.

  1. King Crimson: In the Wake of Poseidon; 1970
  2. Jonesy: Keeping Up; 1973
  3. Kestrel: Kestrel; 1975
  4. Gracious!: This is...Gracious!; 1972
  5. Julian Jay Savarin: Waiters On The Dance; 1971
  6. Raw Material: Raw Material; 1970
  7. Sandrose: Sandrose; 1972
  8. Twink: Think Pink; 1969
  9. P.F.M.: Storia di un Minuto; 1972
  10. Wind: Morning; 1972


Wilson Park tells me he lives 'in his mind', which really has to go under 'Rest of World'. His imaginary album is titled Mellow Mellotrons. And why not?

Put that lot on a CD in that order and you will be in sonic seventh heaven!!!


Ruud Cremer (Netherlands)


Luis G López (Monterrey, México)

  1. King Crimson: Starless (Red; 1974)
  2. Genesis: Blood on the Rooftops (Wind & Wuthering; 1976)
  3. Yes: The Revealing Science of God (Tales From Topographic Oceans; 1973)
  4. PFM: Appena un Po (Per un Amico; 1972)
  5. Museo Rosenbach: Zarathustra (Zarathustra; 1973)
  6. Pulsar: The Strands of the Future (The Strands of the Future; 1976)
  7. Rustichelli & Bordini: Esvegliarsi in un Giorno (Opera Primo; 1973)
  8. Celeste: Favole Antiche (Principe di un Giorno; 1976)
  9. Clearlight: 1st Movement (Symphony; 1975)
  10. Focus: Le Clochard (Moving Waves; 1971)

Plus some cheeky 'honourable mentions', which takes Luis' list up to 15, but won't be included in the statistics:

And DVD appearances!:


Andrew Maitland (Newcastle, Australia). Andrew owns M400 #1122, ex-Sebastian Hardie

  1. Beatles: Strawberry Fields Forever (single; 1967) My first encounter with the Mellotron. You've got to wonder why they didn't use it more often
  2. Moody Blues: Candle of Life (To Our Childrens' Childrens' Children; 1969) There are, doubtless, better 'Tron performances by Mike Pinder. I just picked this one 'cos it's my favourite Moodies tune
  3. Spring: The Prisoner (Eight By Ten) (Spring; 1971) Three Mellotron players. Need one say more?
  4. Yes: And You and I (Close to the Edge; 1972) The 'Tron passages and those three-part harmonies are just sublime. Who cares that the lyrics are dribble?!
  5. Genesis: Silent Sorrow in Empty Boats (The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway; 1974) Magical. Beautiful. And, apart from a bit of cymbal tickling, no Phil Collins
  6. King Crimson: Cirkus (Lizard; 1971) With that brass sound, perfect for frightening small children on night-time car trips
  7. Tintern Abbey: Beeside (single; 1967) Brilliant, obscure and totally barking bonkers! TA only ever released one single in their lifetime - this track being the A side
  8. Pink Floyd: Sysyphus (Ummagumma; 1969) From the studio half of most people I know quote as their least favourite Floyd album. Yes, even the ones who've heard Animals [Ed. Animals is my FAVOURITE Floyd album...]
  9. Add N to (X): Machine is Bored With Love (Avant Hard; 1999) Analogue synth fetishists who got hold of a 'Tron by their 3rd (and best) album Avant Hard. This track also samples Egg's 'Fugue in Dm'
  10. Kinks: Do You Remember Walter? (Village Green Preservation Society; 1968)


Bill Rendall (Australia). Bill's list is chronological


Johannes Koskela (Finland)


Matthijs Herder (Netherlands)

  1. Anekdoten: Ricochet (Gravity; 2003)
  2. Yes: And You and I (Close to the Edge; 1972)
  3. Museo Rosenbach: Zarathustra (Zarathustra; 1973)
  4. Yes: Heart of the Sunrise (Fragile; 1971)
  5. King Crimson: The Devil's Triangle (In the Wake of Poseidon; 1970)
  6. Yes: Close to the Edge (Close to the Edge; 1972)
  7. Genesis: Eleventh Earl of Mar (Wind & Wuthering; 1976)
  8. King Crimson: Starless (Red; 1974)
  9. Yes: The Gates of Delirium (Relayer; 1974)
  10. England: Three Piece Suite (Garden Shed; 1977)


Jouko Heikkala (Oulu, Finland)


JMF Martikorena (Basque Region, Spain)

  1. Yes: And You and I (Close to the Edge; 1972)
  2. King Crimson: Sailor's Tale (Islands; 1971)
  3. Yes: The Revealing Science of God (Tales From Topographic Oceans; 1973)
  4. Genesis: The Cinema Show (Selling England By the Pound; 1973)
  5. Steve Hackett: Spectral Mornings (Spectral Mornings; 1979)
  6. Genesis: Dancing With the Moonlit Knight (Selling England By the Pound; 1973)
  7. Yes: Heart of the Sunrise (Fragile; 1971)
  8. Yes: Awaken (Going for the One; 1977)
  9. Moody Blues: Question (A Question of Balance; 1970)
  10. Genesis: Blood on the Rooftops (Wind & Wuthering; 1976)


Gerard Nowak (Poznań, Poland)

  1. Moody Blues: Legend of a Mind (In Search of the Lost Chord; 1968) These pitchbent strings were somewhat of a revelation for me at the age of 12
  2. Moody Blues: Out and in (To Our Childrens' Childrens' Children; 1969) The definitive Mark II sound to reflect the beauty of the world
  3. Moody Blues: Gypsy (live) (Caught Live + 5; 1969/77) Might be a little off-key, but still overwhelming in its rawness
  4. Bee Gees: Every Christian Lion Hearted Man Will Show You (First; 1967) The melody is less than rudimentary, but the tone more than saves the day; nowhere else did I hear anything so effective in its simplicity
  5. Beatles: Strawberry Fields Forever (single; 1967) The ending of the 'slow version' to be sped up afterwards, what a pity it didn't make it to the final edit!
  6. Yes: Heart of the Sunrise (Fragile; 1971) Delicious interplay with the drums and bass
  7. Moody Blues: Beyond (To Our Childrens' Childrens' Children; 1969) The heavenly flutes!
  8. Rolling Stones: 2000 Light Years From Home (Their Satanic Majesties Request; 1967)
  9. Beatles: Flying (Magical Mystery Tour; 1967) The trombone!
  10. Genesis: Fly on a Windshield (The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway; 1974)


Pier "THM" (Belgium)

  1. King Crimson: Epitaph (In the Court of the Crimson King; 1969) One of my favourite prog rock songs, full of Mellotron sounds (the drum roll at the beginning, the mighty Mellotron strings through the whole song, and maybe more)
  2. Tangerine Dream: Phaedra (Phaedra; 1974) The choir, and not to forget the powerful mix of Mellotron cello & strings that makes the end of the song really shivering my spine...
  3. Free System Projekt: Naiad (Atmospheric Conditions; 2002) Mellotron choir, flutes and strings in a really fantastic song from a great Dutch electronic band - also have a listen to 'Thalassa' (recommended to every 70s Tangerine Dream lover like me - notice that they only use Mellotron samples but it still gives an idea of the real stuff)
  4. Tangerine Dream: Rubycon Part 2 (Rubycon; 1975) Especially the dreamy flutes part at the end would never be the same without the Mellotron
  5. Yes: Heart of the Sunrise (Fragile; 1971) My favourite Yes song, with the Mellotron strings well used
  6. Genesis: Dancing With the Moonlit Knight (Selling England By the Pound; 1973) I love this song (and actually the whole album 'Selling England By The Pound' - still my favourite Genesis album)
  7. David Bowie: Space Oddity (Space Oddity; 1969) Classic song, from a classic singer, using the classic old Mellotron strings, played by a classic keyboard player (Rick Wakeman) - should I say more?
  8. Genesis: Watcher of the Skies (Foxtrot; 1972)
  9. King Crimson: The Court of the Crimson King (In the Court of the Crimson King; 1969) Another great song from the album with the same name, full of Mellotron strings and flutes
  10. Moody Blues: Nights in White Satin (Days of Future Passed; 1967) Mellow song, but another real Mellotron classic (as well as most stuff by The Moody Blues - all full of Mellotron)


Daniel (Capetown, South Africa)

In alphabetical order...


Tilo Preitz (Cologne, Germany)


Julian Riley (Helsinki, Finland, via Leeds, UK)

  1. Tintern Abbey: Beeside (single; 1967) I'm surprised no-one's featured this in their favourites yet... one of the eeriest examples of English psychedelia, must have listened to it a thousand times & still lifts the bristles on me neck
  2. Rolling Stones: On With the Show (Their Satanic Majesties' Request; 1967) A much-maligned album (except here, it would seem), and this track gets the most stick of all. I don't give a rat's what the 'authorities' at Mojo/Record Collector/Smug Know-It-All Pillock's Monthly (with free CD) say - this is a monstrous Mellotron-soaked piece of hokum and I've been annoying people with it for years
  3. Spring: Golden Fleece (Spring; 1971) I find much of this album a tad overrated, but it is drenched in Mellotron and certainly has the odd smattering of sit-up-and-listen moments... through a reasonable set of headphones this track sounds quite brilliant
  4. Amazing Friendly Apple: Magician (b-side; 1969) Leeds lads, just like me - but that didn't sweeten my judgement. Ultra-rare psych-prog with awesome washes of 'Tron sweeping in & out of the finale; makes The Nice sound... well, nice. Their manager is still around, managing a record shop in Leeds. My girlfriend's sister tried to prise an original copy out of him but alas...
  5. A.P. Dangerfield: Conversations (in a Station Light Refreshment Bar) Pts 1 & 2 (single; 1967) Bit of an oddity, this - to my knowledge yet to be anthologized (could be wrong though), I bought this single back in the '80s as part of a job-lot from a dealer in London. Nothing known about the artist; I'm guessing it's a studio knock-up but a pretty nice one nonetheless; the 'Tron is everywhere on both sides of this rather bleak little pop vignette
  6. Moody Blues: Out and in (To Our Childen's Children's Children; 1969) Lots about The Moodies on this site so I won't waste words. Suffice to say, this number is Planet Mellotron...
  7. Joy Division: Decades (Closer; 1980) My favourite combo ever...... shame they didn't employ The Monster more often. Can you imagine 'Isolation', 'Heart & Soul' or 'I Remember Nothing' swathed in clouds of 'Tron? One can but wonder...
  8. Family: Mellowing Grey (Music in a Dolls House; 1968) Heart-wrenching... was a toss-up between this and 'Voyage' from the same album, the latter being quite possibly the scariest example of Mellotron usage ever committed to tape
  9. Manfred Mann: Semi-Detached Suburban Mr James (single; 1966) Kitchen-sink class from this alarmingly consistent group; I also like the 'Tron bleats on 'Brown And Porters (Meat Exporters)' from the CD version of 'Up The Junction', though I'm not sure where that track originates from... a foreign 45 maybe?
  10. St Giles System: Swedish Tears (b-side; 1969) Now then.... is it or isn't it? This wonderful slab of Dutch pop-psych has had me baffled for years. Some days I'm utterly convinced that's a Mellotron grooving along in the backwash, other times I'm not so sure. Confirmation either way would be welcome


Julien Claassen (Hamm, Germany)


David Canis (Celaya, Mexico)


Kyle Keski-Hynnila (British Columbia, Canada)

  1. Spring: The Prisoner (Eight By Ten) (Spring; 1971)
  2. Manfred Mann: Country Dancing (Mighty Garvey!; 1968)
  3. Cliff Wade: You've Never Been to My House (single; 1969)
  4. Aphrodite's Child: You Always Stand in My Way (End of the World; 1969)
  5. Moody Blues: Beyond (To Our Children's Children's Children; 1969)
  6. Jason Crest: A Place in the Sun (single; 1968)
  7. Manfred Mann: Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James (single; 1966)
  8. Pink Floyd: Sysyphus (Part One) (Ummagumma; 1969)
  9. Elmer Gantry's Velvet Opera: What's the Point of Leaving (Elmer Gantry's Velvet Opera; 1969)
  10. The Kinks: Sitting By the Riverside (Village Green Preservation Society; 1968)